Allocation of seats if the size of the Lok Sabha is allowed to grow

If the size of the Lok Sabha is allowed to grow, rather than staying at its current size of 543 elected MPs, there is no need for any State to lose representation through the delimitation process. The following simulation uses the provisional figures for State populations from the 2001 Census to estimate the total number of seats required to ensure that seats are distributed proportionately, and yet no State has the number of MPs returned reduced. There is no real reason for the number of MPs to be fixed, and all previous delimitations have seen the size of the House increase.

As with the simulations for a fixed sized Lok Sabha (shown here) the States and Union Territories with a population of less than six million have not been included in the calculations requiring proportionate allocation of seats. However, only a few allocations differ from the proportionate, given a minimal allocation of one seat. Only Arunachal Pradesh, Goa, Manipur, and Meghalaya, which should only receive one seat but have their allocation of two retained, receive special treatment under this allocation. The calculations are based on a divisor of 1,613,000.

The table suggests that if the size of the Lok Sabha were allowed to rise to 647 then no State would lose representation through the delimitation exercise. A total of 104 new MPs would be created. 23 of these would be returned by Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra would return 12 more seats, Bihar 11 more seats, and Rajasthan 10. Whereas in the current house the four Southern States of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, and Tamil Nadu return 24 per cent of the total MPs elected, under such a redistribution the proportion of MPs from the South would fall to 21 per cent. This reflects the changing demographic pattern across India.

Whilst the Constitution limits the size of the Lok Sabha, each previous delimitation has seen the size of the House grow. This is one way of adjusting to the increasing size of each constituency in terms of population. Between 1971 and 2001, whilst the Lok Sabha grew from 518 to 543 seats, the average population for each constituency has grown by 79 per cent, from 1,058,223 to 1,891,372. Increasing the number of elected MPs to 647 would reduce the average constituency size to 1,587,349

Proportionate Seat allocation with enlarged Lok Sabha

Increase in number of seats returned

All India

647

104

Andhra Pradesh

47

5

Arunachal Pradesh

2

0

Assam

17

3

Bihar

51

11

Chhatisgarh

13

2

Goa

2

0

Gujarat

31

5

Haryana

13

3

Himachal Pradesh

4

0

Jammu and Kashmir

6

0

Jharkhand

17

3

Karnataka

33

5

Kerala

20

0

Madhya Pradesh

37

8

Maharashtra

60

12

Manipur

2

0

Meghalaya

2

0

Mizoram

1

0

Nagaland

1

0

Orissa

23

2

Punjab

15

2

Rajasthan

35

10

Sikkim

1

0

Tamil Nadu

39

0

Tripura

2

0

Uttar Pradesh

103

23

Uttaranchal

5

0

West Bengal

50

8

A and N Islands

1

0

Chandigarh

1

0

DNH

1

0

DD

1

0

Delhi

9

2

Lakshadweep

1

0

Pondicherry

1

0