People Feature

Andrew Hurrell

Emeritus Fellows
Emeritus Fellow

Research Interests : Theories of international relations; theories of global governance; the history of thought on international relations; comparative regionalism; and the international relations of the Americas (in particular Brazil).

Andrew Hurrell is Montague Burton Professor of International Relations at Oxford University and a Fellow of Balliol College. He was elected to the British Academy in 2011 and to the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars in 2010. He is a Delegate of Oxford University Press and a member of the Finance Committee (the board of the company).

His research interests cover theories of international relations; theories of global governance; the history of thought on international relations; comparative regionalism; and the international relations of the Americas, with particular reference to Brazil. His current work focuses on emerging powers and on the history of the globalization of international society. He is completing a short introduction to global governance.

Collaborative projects include: (a) The Post-Atlantic Age: A 21st Century Concert of Powers. The project is based at the Peace Research Institute in Frankfurt and is funded by a one million Euro grant from the Volkswagen Stiftung, the Compagnia di San Paolo, and the Riksbankens Jubileumsfond as part of their ‘Europe and Global Challengers’ programme. The project does not seek to apply 19th century models directly to 21st century realities. Instead it uses historical and theoretical understandings of major power groupings or concerts to shed light on the dilemmas of contemporary global governance. (b) PRIMO (Power and Regions in a Multipolar Order) is a large-scale 3.5 million euro EU-funded doctoral training network established under the Mare Curie Initial Training Network Programme. It involves network of universities in Germany, the UK, Turkey, China, India, Brazil, South Africa, Russia and Portugal, as well as non-academic institutional participation. Oxford has a post-doctoral fellow and two funded doctoral students. Oxford’s work is concentrated on the analytical framework for the programme and on questions related to the globalization of the study of International Relations. And (c) Re-imagining the Global Nuclear Order. This Oxford-Stanford project, supported by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, brings together historians and political scientists from western and non-western countries to examine the changing interaction between the international system and the global nuclear order.

Publications include On Global Order. Power, Values and the Constitution of International Society (OUP, 2008) which was the winner of International Studies Association Prize for Best Book in the field of International Relations in 2009; (with Ngaire Woods), Inequality, Globalization and World Politics (1999); and (with Louise Fawcett), Regionalism in World Politics (1995).